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The BBC series “The Paradise” is as sweet and tasty as English butter toffee

And now for something completely different…

Just finished watching season one of the absolutely delightful British-made short series The Paradise.  (on Netflix – I know)

The IMDB overview of the series: The story of a young woman who works in a department store and gets caught up in the charms of the modern world.

It’s period piece set in Victorian England, wonderfully costumed and acted with great verve and charm by the whole cast.

In a nutshell, the comely and spirited young Denise moves to London and takes a position as a salesgirl at the newfangled ladies-oriented department store The Paradise – helmed by the handsome and debonair widower Moray.

Of course Denise falls for Moray and Moray for her, but this is class-bound England in the late 1800’s, and while Our Heroine pines for Moray, he is courting the Lady Glendenning  (and also courting her father Lord Glendenning’s deep pockets…)

The supporting actors are terrific, the character’s tightly drawn and the cast is given room to fully inhabit their roles.

But the single best thing about The Paradise is the care and tenderness the writer’s place in thier menagerie of clerks, shop keepers and everyday folks who make the drama a real joy to watch.

The writer’s obviously like the characters they have drawn – and it shows in all kinds of small and telling ways.

A nice departure from the smarm and snark of too many shows these days.

If you have the inkling, window shop a couple of episodes –  odds are you’ll end up buying the store.

The Paradise is a delight.

Bruno Strozek

Written by Bruno Strozek

Bruno Strozek is the author of occasionally semi-coherent piffle and has been a Writer/Editor at Sparta Report since July 2016.

Strozek, along with his alter-egos the decadent, drug-addled Sixties refugee Uncle Bruno and his intolerably feminist SJW Cousin Brunoetta have been riding the not-yet crested wave of deplorability with posts covering politics, sports, entertainment and zombies.

Aptly described as both "hilarious and deeply disturbed" Strozek has enthusiastically embraced the recommendation of the late Raoul Duke that "when the going gets weird the weird turn pro."

Although he has fallen far short of his bucket-list goal of writing for such respectable rags as The National Enquirer and The Weekly World News Strozek is grateful for the opportunity to pen his unhinged screeds at Sparta Report and is constantly amazed and delighted at the reception his pieces receive in the cements.

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