Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg calls Lindsey Graham a Woman

I said this last night, I like this healthcare plan. THERE I SAID IT.

Since Trump is not going to do anything to McConnell other than berate him on Twitter over the filibuster… and McConnell won’t overrule the hack, liberal democrat parliamentarian (who reversed her opinion on what was eligible for reconciliation, a few years after she approved the same provisions) on any reconciliation bill, this by far is the best bill that I’ve seen that modifies Obamacare.

No it doesn’t repeal it, and yes that is a broken promise, but it replaces enough sections of the bill that it draws down nearly every big entitlement that Obamacare creates. It ends the expansions in ten years and draws down spending drastically over the next few years.

Plus it shifts the battle back to the states, where it is far more likely that we will see the liberal states cave on the individual mandate and all the other costly requirements that Obamacare created for insurance. But if they don’t, the individual states are on the hook, not the entire country.

The only thing I don’t like about it is that pre-existing conditions must still be covered, although it does allow the states to have wiggle room there too.

I expect premiums will decrease quite a bit as plans transition over to this new system.

Lindsay Graham says that he expects to get the 50 votes needed to pass, waiting on McCain, Murkowski, and Collins to see if they have gotten the bitter mean girl personalities out yet, or if they will man up and pass the bill.

The Senate is the only hurdle left on this bill, if they pass it, Ryan will pass it as soon as possible. The Freedom Caucus has already pledged to support the bill.

“I really believe we’re going to get 50 Republican votes,” Graham told reporters after a closed-door GOP caucus lunch on Tuesday. “I’ve never felt better about where we’re at.”

He added that House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) has told him that if “you pass it, we pass it.”

Graham’s bullish tone comes as he and Sen. Bill Cassidy (R-La.) are trying to win over enough support for their bill that would repeal and replace much of ObamaCare.

The White House and Ryan have thrown their weight behind the bill as lawmakers face an end-of-the-month deadline to pass a repeal bill with a simple majority and avoid a Democratic filibuster.

An ObamaCare repeal bill couldn’t pass the Senate if Republicans needed 60 votes, including the support of at least eight Democrats.

Both Graham and Cassidy have said they have roughly 48 GOP senators willing to support their bill.

Republican Sens. Lisa Murkowski (Alaska), Susan Collins (Maine), and John McCain (Ariz.) are undecided on the bill. Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) has said he cannot support it.

Graham also predicted that some Democrats could be “struggling” to vote no, even though the 48 members of the conference are all expected to oppose Graham-Cassidy.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) separately said Democrats wouldn’t support the bill.