Google Pixel 2

Google’s Pixel phone last year was an unexpected success, running into supply problems as Google discovered they vastly underestimated the demand for the phone. Buoyed by consumer interest, Google has been hard at work developing the Pixel 2 to try to capitalize on its 2016 success. The company is hoping to challenge Samsung and Apple’s dominance in the smartphone market.

In an increasingly saturated market, can Google eat some of Samsung’s and Apple’s pieces of the pie? We will find out:

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The tech giant will reveal what is expected to be called the Google Pixel 2 alongside a larger XL version. The phone is thought to be among the first new models to feature the Android Oreo operating system, along with a larger curved screen and a more powerful processor.

The release, which comes weeks after Apple unveiled its premium iPhone X smartphone, also has Google tipped to release a host of new hardware, including a mini version of its Google Home smart speaker, an updated Daydream VR headset, and a brand new laptop for its premium Chromebook line.

The Google Pixel 2 will keep many similar design elements from the first phone, including a single lens camera and a rear mounted fingerprint scanner.

The smaller phone is expected to have a similar screen size to the old models, at 5 inches, but a report from Android Police suggests it will have thinner sides and a slightly rounded screen, while the XL version will have a larger 6-inch screen. Concept designs by ConceptCreator based on the leaks show a screen that sits almost at the edges of the device.

The normal Pixel 2 is expected to have its main camera sitting closer to the centre of the phone, while the Pixel 2 XL will its camera sighted slightly off centre.

Google has gone in heavily on its virtual reality capabilities, launching the Google Pixel with its Daydream View last year. Now, Google is also set to prime the Pixel 2 for virtual reality, launching a new Daydream View VR headset, according to Droidlife.

While I like Google’s Pixel phones (even if Patrick, with good reason, does not), I am not too impressed with the “Pixelbook” Chromebook. The point of the Chromebook was always to be a cheap laptop for easy web browsing, and not much else. Charging more than $1,000 for a “premium” Chromebook seems very silly to me and likely an attempt to appeal to “prestige” buyers, the same sorts of people who buy Apple products as a status symbol.

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