Trump McConnell

On the Tom Price resignation, he likely was going to be fired after the disastrous healthcare fiasco’s, being as he was brought in to help the President get repeal and replace through Congress:

HHS Secretary Tom Price resigned Friday in the face of multiple federal inquiries and growing criticism of his use of private and government planes for travel, at a cost to taxpayers of more than $1 million since May.

The White House said the former seven-term Georgia congressman, 63, offered his resignation earlier in the day and that President Donald Trump had accepted it.

Price becomes the first Trump administration Cabinet secretary to step down. The White House said Trump asked Deputy Assistant Health Secretary Don Wright to serve as acting secretary of the agency, which has an annual budget of $1.15 trillion and includes the Medicare and Medicaid programs, as well as the FDA, NIH and CDC.

As late as Thursday, Price said he believed he had the president’s support. But the tumult surrounding his travel became another distraction for an administration already reeling from the defeat of repeated Senate efforts to repeal Obamacare and facing criticism for its hurricane relief efforts in Puerto Rico.

In his resignation letter, Price expressed regret that “recent events” distracted from efforts to overhaul the health care system, reduce regulatory burdens and improve global health. “In order for you to move forward without further disruption, I am officially tendering my resignation as the Secretary of Health and Human Services effective 11:59 PM on Friday,” Price wrote.

The first poll out on Alabama’s Senate race, Roy Moore is six points ahead of the Democrat competitor, just like this last election, republican establishment friendly voters are likely going to vote Democrat… making this race a lot closer than it should be.

Alabama Republican Roy Moore leads Democrat Doug Jones by less than 6 points in a new Senate special election poll that’s likely to raise questions about whether the deep-red state is in play.

Moore, the controversial former judge who won Tuesday’s GOP primary runoff, leads Moore [sic] by a margin of 50.2 percent to 44.5 percent in a new poll conducted by Opinion Savvy and commissioned by Decision Desk HQ. About 5 percent of polled voters said they were undecided.

Democrats are cautiously eying the race in the hopes that Moore’s penchant for controversy can help them pull a surprise upset. Moore has a solid base of support among the state’s evangelical community, a reliable voting bloc, thanks to losing his position as chief justice of the state Supreme Court twice for disregarding court orders on the separation of church and state and gay marriage.

But he’s also drawn serious criticism for both those decisions as well as some controversial comments he’s made in the past. He’s argued that terror attacks and violence may have been caused by a drift away from religion, that homosexual conduct should be illegal, and said that a Muslim congressman shouldn’t be seated in Congress.

 


 

Now the House of Representatives leadership is getting pissed at the Senate GOP leadership because the House can deliver on the goods… while the Senate has done nothing.

The House membership is fretting that the Senate GOP is getting everyone ready to see another round of failure theater, which is likely going to be the case with the tax reform bill being presented.

The House of Representatives, including the leadership, is starting to feel the pressure and is lashing out:

A day after the GOP presented a united front around the rollout of President Trump’s tax plan, House Republicans are expressing deep reservations about the Senate’s ability to get the job done.

Lawmakers stung over the failure to pass ObamaCare repeal worry the same fate could befall the tax measure if a handful of senators raise objections.

“Donald Trump won with an electoral landside and his three big campaign points were ObamaCare repeal, tax reform and border security. For a handful of senators to derail that agenda is very frustrating,” said Rep. Blake Farenthold (R-Texas).

Rep. Tom Cole (R-Okla.), who is close to the House GOP leadership, says colleagues are frustrated with a handful of senators “overruling the will of the entire House.”

“We do need to see them step up and actually deliver for a change. We have over 200 bills sitting stalled over there. They haven’t been able to deliver on [health care] reform and they all ran on it and now we have a do-or-die moment on tax reform,” he said.

There’s also a sense among House Republicans that their Senate brethren aren’t under the same pressure to get results — perhaps because the GOP’s majority in the Senate is seen as safer in the 2018 midterm elections than the House majority.

“They put our majority in jeopardy with their failure on health care, more than they did their own,” Cole said.